Easter trading

Category Archives: What’s Happening in the Shop

Easter trading
16th April, 2019
Support Wildlife Conservation Co this Easter by buying Easter Bilby chocolates.

Easter 2019 Opening Times and Deliveries Main shop*

Good Friday               19th April    CLOSED

Easter Saturday           20th April    OPEN 8.30am – 5.00 pm

Easter Sunday             21st April     CLOSED

Easter Monday            22nd April    OPEN 10am – 3pm

Anzac Day                   25th April     OPEN 1pm – 4pm

Fruit and vegetable deliveries will be as follows:

Monday               15th April

Wednesday        17th April

Tuesday               23rd April

Friday                  26th April

Fridge goods

Wednesday        17th April

Wednesday        24th April

Bread deliveries

Ancient Grains, Naturis and Vitality

Tuesday               16th April

Wednesday        24th April

Black Cockatoo Bakery –

Thursday 18th April

Saturday 20th April

*BIG LITTLE SHOP WILL BE CLOSED GOOD FRIDAY AND EASTER SUNDAY

Fare trade
27th March, 2019

How does the Co-op stack up against its competitors price-wise?

Most certified organic fruit and vegetables are cheaper at the Co-op than local supermarkets.

With three major supermarkets, a new bulk food store and the Co-op in town, Katoomba shoppers are spoilt for choice. So we’re making it a little easier to compare apples with apples and find the best deal on fresh produce, bulk goods and staples with this price comparison table.

Download this table as a pdf

When assessing the table important factors to consider include the Co-op’s pricing on fresh fruit and veg. We keep our mark-up to a minimum to make produce more affordable for members. And we prioritise local and bulk products which ensures provenance and reduced or nil packaging.

There’s no denying organic food can be expensive, but if you buy what’s in season and local you can save.

You will note our organic cold pressed extra virgin olive oil is more expensive than the two major supermarkets. This is due to the high quality of our product and suppliers. Rosnay olive oil is produced in Canowindra, 200 kilometres west of Katoomba, by the Statham family. The Stathams grow olives, grapes and figs using biodynamic principles. They also developed a community of certified organic farms in Canowindra to regenerate degraded land and assist the sustainability and harmony of a number of small growers.

Our other organic cold pressed extra virgin olive oil is from Toscana in the Grampians region of Victoria. Established in 1943, this award-winning family owned business values quality over quantity and is one of Australia’s oldest olive groves.

These oils are also sold in bulk, something the supermarkets don’t do.

Prices are current as at Wednesday March 27.

Too cool for school
17th January, 2019

Delicious lunchbox ideas
Back to school and work needn’t mean boring sandwiches. Check out these yummy lunch ideas from Danielle O’Donoghue.

Wraps

In the heat of summer large amounts of bread becomes less attractive. These 3 wrap ideas make lighter alternatives to hold tasty nutritious fillings. They are all gluten-free and some even grain free altogether.

Lettuce Leaf Wraps

Using the leaves of lettuce, Ice berg or Cos work well, makes a great alternative to bread for wrapping up tasty ingredients.

Protein Wraps

INGREDIENTS:

4 eggs

20g sesame seeds ground fine

20g sunflower seeds ground fine

lg pinch sea salt

¼ tsp sumac

60g tapioca flour

6 tsp coconut oil or ghee

METHOD:

Whisk all the ingredients except the fat together in a large bowl, adding 2 Tblsp of water.

In a medium size non-stick (a well seasoned cast iron one is my favourite) pan, heat 1 tsp of oil or ghee, tip the pan to coat the frying surface.

Pour in ¼ cup of the batter and tilt the pan around to spread the batter evenly over the surface.

Cook over medium heat for till lightly golden on the underside, about 1-2 mins.

Flip and cook on the other side till it looks the same, around 30 seconds.

Remove from pan and set aside.

Repeat with the remaining batter and fat.

Sourdough Buckwheat Wraps

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups buckwheat flour

2 L luke warm water

(Acidic medium of choice 1 tsp lemon juice, applecider vinegar, or  Tblsp whey)

2 eggs

pinch salt

1/4 -3/4 cup extra water as needed

coconut oil  or ghee for cooking

METHOD:

Culturing your buckwheat flour

Soak the 2 cups of buckwheat flour in a glass or ceramic bowl with the luke warm water and acid medium. Give the flour a good whisk to make sure you break up any lumps. This also exposes the mixture to airborne yeasts. It should be a very runny and smooth batter. Cover the bowl with a clean tea towel and leave to sit overnight or 5-6 hours in a warm place.

After fermenting/culturing the flour will have settled to the bottom of the bowl, pour off the dirty viscous water, using a spoon for the last bit so you don’t loose your batter down the sink! This process neutralizes the anti-nutrients in the flour.

Making the crepe batter

Add the eggs, maple, vanilla and salt and whisk into a smooth pourable batter. Add extra water as necessary to achieve desired consistency. Don’t be afraid to make it quite runny.

Transfer the batter to a pouring jug.

Heat a small amount of coconut oil in a well seasoned cast iron or non stick pan. Often the first crepe doesn’t work – it’s called “one for the pan” after that the pan should be ready to make delicious crepes.

Pour about half a cup of batter into the heated pan.

Swirl the pan to spread the batter.

Once bubbly and becoming solid on the top side, flip your crepe, and cook the other side.

A couple of minutes each side is plenty.

Filling Ideas

Hummous, Pesto, Tahini sauce, Avocado, Tomato, Grated or finely sliced carrot, red onion finely sliced, Capsicum finely sliced, Toasted seeds, Baby spinach, Rocket, Pitted olives, Salmon or tuna, Chicken, Cheese, Sprouts, Hard boiled egg, Lettuce.

 

10 minutes with…The Herbiary creators
21st November, 2018

We are lucky to have some talented staff on the team at the Co-op. Relief worker and herbalist Maddison Pitt, who started in May this year, recently launched a range of herbal skin and body care products with her partner Del Woodland under the label The Herbiary. We asked Maddison to tell us a little bit about herself and the brand.

Q: What is your background and how did you come to be working at the Co-op?

A: I wanted to be a part of the Co-op as soon as I started to shop there. My background is in retail, most recently working in a community pharmacy. My partner and I joined the Co-op a few years ago and loved the ethos and focus on low environmental impact, supporting local growers and makers whilst providing needed resources for the community. After graduating from Western Herbal Medicine at the end of 2017 I wanted a workplace that was like-minded and was lucky enough to secure a position at the Co-op.

Q: What got you interested in herbalism?

A: I started to question the way we ‘do’ health. Complimentary medicine focuses on people as a whole being, an approach that resonated with me. The philosophy of herbal medicine, encompassing our physical, spiritual, and emotional health led me to study Western Herbal Medicine. I wanted to know what it meant to be a healthy and ‘well’ being.

I was particularly drawn to herbal medicine because of the connection to nature through herbs, plants, and natural materials. It was amazing to think a plant in my backyard may have the ability to heal if prepared in a certain way. The idea of making your own medicine, understanding the process of medicinal manufacturing, and using your hands to heal fascinated me.

Q: What is the ethos behind The Herbiary?

A: We wanted to take a holistic approach to our product range. To us this meant utilising the innate healing ability of herbs while operating kindly. We are committed to treading lightly, our packaging is plastic free, recycled or recyclable. Our ingredients are fairly traded, organic, animal cruelty free and vegan. Kind to your skin, the earth, people and animals.

Q: What products do you make?

A: Our herbal bath salts are currently in store at the Big Little Shop, they are magnesium and herb rich to soothe tired muscles and minds, while nourishing the skin. Our gentle exfoliating body scrubs will be available very soon along with our moisturising ‘mylk’ bath which is suitable for folks of all ages.

Q: What other services do you offer?

A: I also offer herbal medicine consultations where I can formulate personalised herbal preparations. Both Del and I have lots of projects on the go and even more ideas for 2019. You can follow our socials or head to our website to see more!

@the.herbiary

theherbiary.com.au

Suggestion box
21st November, 2018

Your say

We value your comments and suggestions. Here are a few recent ideas.

We’ve had quite a few comments coming through the suggestion box recently. From requests for millet flakes and Tulsi tea – we’re looking into these – to support and condemnation for selling meat at the Co-op.

We value all your feedback so please keep it coming in a respectful manner, and if you’d like to email us hello@bmfoodcoop.org.au

It’s a village out there!
21st November, 2018

The Village by Matt and Lentil

A book to make you “yearn for that deep connection to people and places close to you.”

What an amazing book! Set out in three parts (the village, the growing and of course the eating) it is a thorough bible for sustainable living.

The authors’ shared experience of villages really makes you yearn for that deep connection to people and places close to you.

I loved Matt and Lentil’s advice on growing including ideas about how anyone can grow, even if you’re renting or living in a flat. The eight steps to natural gardening are so interesting and detailed. Being a novice in the garden, I found it really useful to read a frank description of what they do and when.

The planting projects are really inspiring and seem like a doable place to start. The idea to focus on one thing first up is great. I’m particularly drawn to grow an abundance of tomatoes, zucchini and rocket as suggested! Easy to grow, abundant harvest? Yes! The sweet potato crates sound pretty straight forward too.

Just as I started reading The Village I happened upon a bunch of zucchini that had split open. Sure enough, zucchini pickle featured in the book. I have it stewing away in the cupboard and can’t wait to be cracking it open over Xmas. Waste not want not.

The smoothie chart in the recipe section looks so simple and useful. It’s unique, setting out all the different elements and options/quantities to be used to build a great smoothie every time.

The beautiful photographs throughout draw you into a gardeny world and you just want to go live there…or recreate it.

Really inspiring.

Review by Bec Tyson, Co-op sales assistant

Bec’s home-made zucchini pickles. Recipe from The Village by Matt and Lentil, Published by Plum, RRP $45.00, Photography by Shantanu Starick.

Gut instinct
17th October, 2018

Happy body = happy mind

Holistic health coach, Danielle O’Donoghue, shares a yummy Happy Gut salad recipe and explores the nutritional value of the ingredients.

This is the deliciously nutritious Happy Gut Salad I made at Blue Mountains Food Co-op  for Wellness Wednesday on October 17th. It’s full of foods that nourish your gut and microbiome.

Dandelion Greens: This super healthy green is GREAT for your gut. Dandelion greens are full of minerals, improve blood lipids, and they are rich in inulin, a particular prebiotic fibre that boosts your gut’s production of healthy, good-for-you bacteria, bifidobacteria being one.

“Boosting bifidobacteria has a number of benefits including helping to reduce the population of potentially damaging bacteria, enhancing bowel movements, and actually helping boost immune function.” David Perlmutter, MD.

Asparagus: A Spring Veggie That Aids Digestion
Rich in prebiotics, these green stalks are as good for you as they are delicious. Asparagus is also rich in inulin, like dandelion greens. It can help promote regularity and decrease bloating.

Seaweed: Demulcent, nutrient and fibre-rich seaweeds are fantastic gut foods. A study of Japanese women showed that high seaweed intake increases good gut bacteria. Another study researched alginate, a substance in brown seaweed, and found that it can strengthen gut mucus, slow down digestion, and make food release its energy more slowly.

Flaxseed: This superfood seed has the highest content of lignans (antioxidants with potent anticancer properties) of all foods available for human consumption. Flaxseed is fuel for good gut flora. Soluble fibre is also in flaxseeds, helping to improve digestive regularity.

Apples: High in a valuable soluble fibre called pectin. Plus, a 2014 study published in Food Chemistry found green apples boost good gut bacteria. Stewed apples have been found to be good for your microbiome, and they may also help to heal your gut.

Garlic: Pungent and flavoursome garlic is also great for your gut health. A 2013 in-vitro study published in Food Science and Human Wellness found that garlic boosted the creation of good gut microbes. The research showed that garlic might also help prevent some gastrointestinal diseases.

What’s for dinner?
12th September, 2018

How do you answer the dreaded question?

Dish up your dinner winners and you could win one of two cook books.

We’re trying to find some winning dinner ideas to share with Co-op members. You don’t have to provide whole recipes just let us know what your favourite, go-to meals are when hungry kids or partners ask “What’s for dinner?”

Send your answers to hello@bmfoodcoop.org.au with your contact details and you could win one of these two cookbooks.

Cauliflower is King  – 70 recipes to prove it by Leanne Kitchen, Murdoch Books, RRP $19.99

or

Stuffed! The art of the vegetable boat by Marlena Kur, Murdoch Books, RRP $32.99

Competition opens Tuesday September 18 and closes Friday October 12.

There’s nothing “fake” about our local, unprocessed honey.

A recent investigation conducted jointly by Fairfax and the ABC revealed startling evidence of “fake” or adulterated honey on Australian supermarket shelves. Of the 28 jars of “pure” honey tested by German laboratory QSI, 12 were found to be adulterated with honey substitutes.

At the Co-op all our honey is pure, unprocessed and unpasteurised. And we’re lucky enough to have local suppliers including Malfroy’s Gold and Bruce Rogers of Rylstone. Both beekeepers practise natural methods of extraction and harvest from their hives which are placed in isolated areas of western Sydney, the Blue Mountains and central western NSW.

Tim Malfroy (pictured above) of Malfroy’s Gold stated recently on social media that imported “fake” honey “has been an open secret within the industry since at least 2004”. He also thanked supporters for taking an active interest in his “vision for ethical, sustainable Warré style apiculture and locally produced, 100% pure wild honey.” Thank you Tim.

Photo: Eric Tourneret The Bee Photographer

 

Eco-friendly spring cleaning

Ditch harsh chemical cleaning products in your home for these local, eco-friendly substitutes.

After the birth of her son, Archie (Archimedes), Natalie Beak was drawn to a simpler way of life. The freelance art director and television production designer had just made a tree change to the mountains and begun listening to The Slow Home podcast by local mountain’s mum Brooke McAlary. “Brooke spoke about simplifying cleaning products and habits, and I soon realised that we really didn’t need 15 different bottles of chemicals in the home,” Natalie explains.

“I started reading everything I could about natural living and slowing down, notably Rhonda Hetzel’s Down the Earth, Rebecca Sullivan’s The Art of the Natural Home and The Art of Frugal Hedonism by Annie Raser-Rowland and Adam Grubb.” This reading coupled with lots of internet research and even more making and testing, formed the background to a new business idea that was bubbling away in Natalie’s mind.

“Making eco-friendly cleaning products for my own family was one thing, but I wanted to share the idea that natural and simple is best,” she says. “Unless we work in high-risk environments where disease control is paramount, we don’t need to be using harsh chemicals in the home. The basics of vinegar, water and essential oils are really all you need to keep a clean and family-friendly home!” And so, Archimedes and Me was born.

Since then Natalie’s home-made chemical-free cleaning and personal care product range has increased to include kitchen and bathroom and general cleaners, salt scrubs, a magnesium bath soak and even a birthing blend.

Here she shares one of her basic recipes.

All-Purpose Kitchen Spray

In a 500ml spray bottle combine:

3/4 cup of vinegar

35 drops of essential oils (citrus oils like wild orange or lemon are great for dissolving grease, eucalyptus and lemon myrtle have amazing antibacterial properties, and clove is a fabulous mould buster)

Fill the rest of the bottle with distilled or purified water and shake.

NB: This spray is not recommended for natural stone due to the acidic nature of the vinegar and oils but is fantastic for timber or laminate surfaces, floors and cupboards.

For more fantastic eco-friendly cleaning and personal care products come along to the Co-op Thursday 20th September at 11am to Meet the Maker – Natalie Beak of Archimedes and Me.

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